Medical Director UK and Ireland

Matthew

Medical Director

Working across multiple medical, regulatory, compliance and drug safety disciplines. Matthew

What do you do?

Lead a broad team of expert medical, pharmacist and scientifically qualified colleagues in medical affairs, clinical operations, drug safety, regulatory and quality departments to ensure the safe provision of specialist medicines.

What qualifications and experience do you have?

MSC, BSc, BM, Dip Pharm Med & MRCPM

What does your typical day involve?

Every day is different! Early start (to avoid traffic); team meetings; travelling to meet scientific leaders / coach team members – flexible working pattern – work approximately 2 days a week from home.

How has your career developed since you entered the industry?

I have owned my own career: 4 companies, 6 roles over 10 years in research, early clinical development, medical affairs and senior leadership.

When did you decide on a career in the pharmaceutical industry?

08/2007: why: looking for something different! Trained as a pathologist; but realised this career didn't match my core strengths.

Do you work mostly on your own or as part of team?

100% teamwork.

What is it like socially where you work?

Fast, fun, challenging, every day is different.

What are you most proud of in your career?

Leading successful teams achieve significant outcomes often with very short timelines. Seeing my team(s) be recognised locally and  globally – company awards.

Do you think additional qualifications or experience would be an advantage for someone entering the industry now?

Yes

What possibilities are there for your career in the future?

Limitless to my own needs and desires (likely geography and work / life balance for international roles).

What do you think the most important skills are for someone in your role?

Negotiating, communicating, decision making, leading teams to success rather to individually succeeding. Credible medical / technical expertise.

What's the biggest difference between working in academia and the pharmaceutical industry?

Academia is often measured by publication outcomes; working in the pharmaceutical industry is not publication driven and metrics of success vary from company to company depending on their size / structure / portfolio.

What one piece of advice would you give to someone seeking a career in the pharmaceutical industry?

Don't give up (I joined at a time when no-one wanted to recruit a pathologist)